Call for nominations! West African women leaders

Project: West African Women Providing Safe Water and Sanitation

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We are looking for West African women leaders who are working for water security, health, and environmental sustainability in their communities.

The Global Women’s Water Initiative (GWWI) is a joint venture of international organizations A Single Drop, Crabgrass, and Women’s Earth Alliance. The GWWI equips two-person teams of local African women leaders with technology training, introductory business skills, networking support, and seed funding to launch water service projects in their communities that have the potential to become income-generating.

The 2010 West Africa Program is in partnership with WaterAid Ghana and will include a week-long training to be held near Accra, Ghana in late February, 2010. Attendees will create and commit to specific action plans for the year following the training. The GWWI team will provide seed funding and follow-up support for each team to implement a water project.

For more information and the application form click here or email us at womenandwater(at) gmail.com.

70+ gathered for Coming up from the Roots event

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Last night we held the first of three events as part of our Up From The Roots, Weaving the Worlds speaker series. And it was a huge success! We gathered at the Brower Center with over 70 people and we danced, ate, drank, listened, hugged, and learned together. It was a special night full of inspiration and hope.

We had the good fortune of listening to Ashwini Narayanan talk about the power of women and the potential of microlending to change the world. Her organization, MicroPlace, is truly aligned with WEA’s vision and we hope to move into deeper partnership with microlending institutions like Microplace as our work deepens. Ashwini is a fantastic spokesperson for our work and we are very grateful for her efforts to support us. For those that weren’t able to attend, you can watch the video we shared with women’s stories last night here.


Join us on Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 7pm for another inspiring evening. The second event in our Fall Coming up From the Roots series will focus on our Women and Land Initiative, which unites legal and policy advocates with indigenous women environmental justice leaders towards sacred sites protection, energy justice and environmental health. WEA International Advisory Committee member Wahleah Johns, Executive Director of the Black Mesa Water Coalition, will be in conversation with Vien Truong, Senior Policy Associate at Green for All about the recent historic Navajo Green Jobs victory and the national green jobs movement. Learn about the Sacred Earth Advocacy Network and its support for this crucial work from WEA’s Women and Land Initiative Advocacy Director Caitlin Sislin, and be uplifted by a selection of songs from Ruckus Society Executive Director Adrienne Maree Brown.

Here is info about our next event.

Travel With a Purpose: 2010 Advocacy Delegations

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Calling all women advocates with a passion for environmental justice! Women attorneys, advocates, law students and members of the legal profession are invited to join a Women’s Earth Alliance Advocacy Delegation in 2010 – an unparalleled opportunity to meet and collaborate with indigenous women on the frontlines of environmental justice campaigns in North America.

Arsenic Contamination: Water Assessment in Assam, India

Project: Together for H2OPE

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“Cost-effective, user friendly technologies providing pure water are required to counter the serious health hazards due to consumption of As and/or Fe-contaminated water.”

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Map of the Brahmaputra River Basin in India Source: IndiaNetzone

This water assessment research study done by Chetia, Chatterjee, Banerjee, Natah, Singh, Srivastava, and Sarma collected water samples from various regions of the Golaghat district in Assam, India. These samples were analyzed for arsenic, iron, manganese, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, pH, total hardness, and sulfate ions. Results reveal that heavy metals, like As, Fe, and Mn, are present in the water sources and some are present way past the allowed limit. The groundwater contamination reveals the utmost importance of providing safe water for the communities use. WEA, partnering with the Numi Tea Foundation, is undertaking an assessment to provide access to safe water and sanitation in Numi’s tea farming communities in Assam, India.

Philippines Struggle to Supply Most Basic of Needs

Project: Women Uniting for Safe Water in the Philippines

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“The failure to ensure safe water supply and sanitation and the rapidity with which we degrade the environment through air and water pollutants greatly threatens human health and contributes to a high death toll across all ages. The poorest victims, however, are the children.”

In the Philippines, 25 million people do not have access to basic sanitation services and another 13 million lack access to clean water. The costs associated with these disadvantages are huge: disease is rampant, death not uncommon and over $280 million USD in medical expenses and lost income. Attempts are being made by the government to reduce these numbers, following the Millennium Development Goal, but it appears unlikely to be met by 2015. Women and children are the primary fetchers of water, resulting in their continued inability to bring themselves or their families out of poverty if they must constantly be searching for clean water.
You can read the entirety of the article here.