Meet our Spring Interns!

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What’s amazing, and talented and leaves us thinking it’s too good to be true?  
Our WEA intern team! 
We have some serious love for these ladies – and for all of the rockstar interns who have supported WEA over the years.  They help us not only during our big events, but also in the day-to-day running of things, making our work not only possible, but THRIVE.

Because we adore them and their awesome skills, we wanted to introduce our current spring interns to all of you.

We’d also like to send a big heartfelt hug and thanks to some of our previous interns from last fall and early winter: Molly Garritson, Monica Boardman, Germaine Lau and Bess Zewdie.

SOPHIE SPARKSWORTHY – General Intern

1. Tell us about yourself! What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA?  Born and raised in Lake Tahoe, I have always had a deep connection with nature.  Ever since I was little I felt very lucky to be blessed with the wilderness as my playground.  My connection with the wild inspired me to want to protect the bounty and beauty our planet has to offer.  Despite my love for the outdoors, growing up in a small town drove me to San Francisco to attend San Francisco State University to graduate with a Degree in International Relations, and a minor in Russian.

In my five and half years in the Bay Area, I have come to appreciate the vibrancy and vitality that comes from thriving urban communities.  I began to see disparities between communities and individuals more clearly than ever, and decided it would be one of my missions in life to help make positive changes.  After volunteering for community organizations, I realized my passions were focused around global injustices particular to the environment (water especially).  Seeing the work WEA did, I was able to see my two passions linked together to help communities thrive through supporting women.

2. What do you do at WEA?  My role at WEA involves supporting the general operations of the organization, like administrative assistance, and helping to maintain donor relations.  I am also working to support the Advocacy Network, which allows me a wonderful opportunity to research potential and current Indigenous environmental movements and efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change.  Part of this role includes blogging about these significant efforts made by Indigenous communities and organizations.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know.  Two unique things my co-workers might not know are that I have been belly dancing since I was 13 years old, and am currently teaching myself how to costume design.  Rather than keep pets, I raise carnivorous plans as well.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment?  The biggest challenge I see globally for the intersection of women and the environment is access.  Access to the resources, training, and participation in the decision-making process necessary to have more power in maintaining our ecosystems, and having a role in protecting the future of this planet.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why.  One woman who I find to be extremely inspirational for her strength to resist the USSR and create change for so many is Maria Cherkasova.  As a Russian journalist and ecologist during Soviet rule, she forced the government to adopt an environmental program, and address some of the severe ecological issues of the time.  Since then, she has run the largest environmental NGO in the former Soviet Republic.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA.  I was surprised by the amount that play and work are incorporated together.  I was even more surprised to see the results of this combination with an incredible amount being accomplished.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA?  From my time at WEA, I hope to gain a strong understanding of the issues women face globally, and the surrounding climate change.  More importantly, I hope to gain a meaningful understanding for what people are doing to solve these problems, and what those efforts take logistically, financially, and personally.  I hope to gain the hands-on experience and skills that can be utilized for any cause I may involve myself in.

SOPHIA ROSE PENNELLA  – Social Media Intern

1. Tell us about yourself! What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA?  I grew up in Southern and Northern California, spending my school year in Los Angeles and winters and summers in Truckee near Lake Tahoe.  I was raised with an appreciation for the outdoors and a moral code to conserve our natural beauty.  Studying environmental economics in college, with geography, photography, and French as my minors, only crystallized those passions.

I graduated in December 2013 from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and moved to the Bay Area.  I knew that while I was studying for the GRE and advancing my long-term goals of pursuing a graduate level degree in economics and natural resource management, I also wanted to gain some experience working with a non-profit organization doing international development or environmental work.  When I found WEA it was like my dreams had come true.  The organization seemed to be involved in everything I was interested in: development, sustainability, empowering women, co-powering organizations, and environmental management.  At the time I applied, they had no internships available, but I stuck with it and kept in touch, and soon enough one opened up!

2. What do you do at WEA?  I am the Social Media Intern at WEA.  I manage the daily postings on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, spread awareness of WEA’s mission and projects, and connect with other like-minded organizations.  It allows for a lot of creative control and collaboration with the rest of the staff.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know.  I have a pet bird named Stella who travels with my family and me on any road trips we take!  I also would love to open an artisanal dairy products shop one day.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment?  Women, all over the world (including the West), need to be empowered.  They need to be empowered to realize that they hold the key to sustainable change and have access to the resources they need.  This empowerment lies in education (of resources, skills, ability to evoke change) and community building (within their own community, and outside communities and organizations).  The combination of these two factors equips women with the confidence and resources that they need to save our environment.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why.  My mother inspires me.  After being a stay-at-home mother for 18 years, she decided to go back and get a Masters degree in what she truly loved at the age of 50.  Not until she was 52 did she start her career and now she is a powerhouse!  She did not let age or time keep her from achieveing her dreams.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA.  I was suprised at how comfortable I immediately felt at WEA.  The office feels like a home, and even though I can work remotely, I prefer to go into the office.  With that, the staff is incredibly sweet, helpful, and enjoyable to be around.7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA?  I hope to be surrounded by like-minded individuals who are looking for unique and pragmatic approaches to environmental sustainability.  I hope to be inspired by and inspire my co-workers.  I hope to learn the workings of an environmental non-profit.  I also enjoy learning about social media, marketing, and public relations best practices.

Meet the rest of the talented interns that have worked with WEA throughout the years here!

Leading from a Place of History and Learning

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By Kahea Pacheco, WEA Advocacy Network Coordinator

I grew up in a tiny, rural town on the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island of Hawai’i called Honomu.  We are maybe 550 people large, and are a remnant of the old sugar plantation days when the Big 5 sugar companies were king and villages would crop up along coastlines where sugar mills were located. It’s a beautiful, multicultural landscape where eating sugar straight from the cane stalks, watching our fathers throw cast nets down at the ocean, and swimming or catching ‘opae (shrimp) in the streams and waterfalls seemed ordinary.

The first time I can remember recognizing that I was indigenous was when I was sent to a summer camp for Native Hawaiian kids in the fifth grade.  It was a week-long program on a different island from the one I lived on, and I remember knowing I should feel lucky I could go.  That going and learning about my culture was something special, and not everyone had that opportunity.

The second time this happened was when I was accepted into Kamehameha Schools, Kapalama Campus—a private boarding and day school for Native Hawaiian students.  The school, one of the largest philanthropic trusts in the United States, was founded by Ke Ali’i (Chiefess) Bernice Pauahi Bishop, great granddaughter of King Kamehameha I, after she bore witness to the decline of the Hawaiian people as a result of colonization and the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, and felt education was key to our survival.  At Kamehameha, I learned about my legacy, culture, history and language.  I was given opportunities—through school programs, mentorship and scholarships—that allowed me to graduate, to go to college, then law school.

All of this, because I’m Native Hawaiian, and I am a result of our unique history.

For me, being indigenous has been a privilege, both spiritually and practically.  I feel extremely fortunate to have grown up in a space that not only taught me about my history, about myself, but that celebrated it.  Because of this, I also recognize my responsibility.  I have a responsibility to be a leader and a student all at once, to be a good role model, and to give back and uplift my community just like it has uplifted me.  I have a responsibility to those who came before me—my kupuna (grandparents, elders), my ancestors—as well as those who will come after me, for generations and generations to come.

“You will be living the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one….There’s only one thing I ask of you, my children—You are Hawai’i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawai’i.”
– Pilahi Paki (in Then There Were None by Martha H. Noyes)

It’s this journey, however short it’s been so far, that has led me to Women’s Earth Alliance.

I first joined WEA as a Legal Research Intern for the North America Program in 2011.  At the time, I’d been out of law school for two years, had just left from a job that left me feeling disconnected from all the ways I wanted to be present in the world, and so accepted the internship feeling a sense of…relief.  Relief that I would once again be contributing to work I felt most accountable for—supporting Indigenous peoples and communities like my own.

In the two and half years since joining the team, my sense of purpose and responsibility has only been strengthened, particularly in this last year as I’ve stepped into my new role as Advocacy Network Coordinator for the North America Program.  I now find that I am a leader as much as a student, that I am called to make decisions as much as seek insight and advice and guidance.  With this new role then also comes the fear I think many people, particularly young people like myself, have felt when stepping up and being called to share their mana’o (knowledge): fear of not being ready, of making mistakes, of saying or doing the wrong things at the wrong times, of not knowing.

“There are cultures still that understand the importance of being lost.  In fact, they celebrate it, because they know that just beneath the surface, something rich and potent is stirring.  They know that the point at which the latitude of the mind meets the longitude of the heart is the centerpoint.  It is the stillpoint of the wayfinder.”
– Dr. Elizabeth Kapu’uwailani Lindsey, PhD (TEDxWomen 2012)

But it’s times like these, when stepping up, that we need to remind ourselves that we are rarely stepping up alone.  Instead, we are surrounded by the knowledge passed to us from our elders, from our mentors, from our own experiences.  And there are those we defer to, whose expertise is so much more vast than our own—their knowledge is to be recognized and celebrated as well.

For me, this has meant listening deeply to not only myself, but to my sisters, my parents, my grandparents, stretching all the way back to my ancestors, my beginnings.  Stretching all the way across to encompass my larger community—my friends, my colleagues, and the grassroots leaders engaged in this work.  It has meant asking questions, being courageous in my conversations, and honoring those who have shared their stories, knowledge and expertise with me.  This is where my ability and my drive to contribute comes from—from that place of learning and listening and growing.

This is where, I think, as women, as Indigenous peoples, as allies, we all find our strength to contribute.

Meet our Summer Interns!

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How is it nearly August already? It seems like the summer has just flown by as we’ve been preparing for our annual Gala taking place on September 19th in San Francisco. None of what we’ve accomplished these last months would have been possible without our team of talented interns! These ladies have been an absolute joy to work with, and have contributed in so many ways to WEA’s success! Here are our summer interns:

CELIA GREENE – General Intern

1. Tell us about yourself! What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA? I’m a student at George Washington University in Washington DC, heading into my second year. I just declared an international affairs major—woo!—and am hoping to concentrate in international development as well as anthropology. I came into WEA more focused on the women’s and community rights side, but became super interested in and intrigued by the connection between women’s rights and environmental justice, which I think WEA does a fantastic job of exploring.

2. What do you do at WEA? I am the general intern at WEA! I help out Kahea with things like processing donations and working in the donor database, and also do bits of super interesting research for the North America Program. I also got to work with Angela, the Director of Development, for a little bit, and everyone in the office has been pitching in with the Gala planning, including me!

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know. There is always the small possibility of me quitting everything and becoming a full-time interior designer. I am also super interested in clothes and style and runway design.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? The biggest struggle in the intersection of women and the environment is, I think, the layers of structural violence inflicted upon the local and indigenous communities that bear the brunt of environmental degradation. Women face discrimination as members of groups that face further discrimination, but what I find so inspiring is that in spite of this they are often the ones raising their voices loudest in struggle, protest, and attempts to change the system.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. I had a professor in my intro to sociocultural anthropology course who had been a part of many mainstream, large scale development projects, the kinds of things that are well intentioned but often massive and prone to failure. She noticed the recurring failures that massive organizations faced in their inability to understand and respect community wishes, traditions, and specific issues. She left the development world and is now writing and studying anthropology in an attempt to resolve some of these issues. I don’t agree with all of anthropology, but admire her for sticking to her guns and doing what she felt was right.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. WEA is such a close-knit group of amazing and inspiring women that forms what truly is a family and I am so grateful that I am able to be a part of this family!

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? I’m young and early on in my career and unsure where exactly it will lead me but WEA has shown me a model of working in the environment in a way that recognizes, supports, and lifts up local solutions rather than employing a top-down, one-size-fits-all model. This collaboration and exploration can be applied to a range of different areas of human, women’s, and community rights and I hope to continue learning about WEA’s unique model through my time here.

EMILY ESPINOSA – Development Intern

1. Tell us about yourself! What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA? I am originally from Santa Barbara, CA and got my undergraduate degree from Santa Clara University in the South Bay where I studied English and Spanish. I just completed my graduate certificate in Nonprofit Management at the University of Oregon and moved to San Francisco this summer. My areas of interest are the environment, international development, and women’s issues – so WEA was the perfect fit!

2. What do you do at WEA? I am the Development Intern for the summer so, I’m assisting Angela Mason, WEA’s amazing new Director of Development, in everything fundraising-related. This includes lots of interesting research, working on mailings and communications, donor relations, and supporting the rest of the staff as the organization prepares for the WEA Gala in September.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know. I love to hike and go backpacking! I am crazy about cooking (and eating) and worked in a kitchen supply store during grad school.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? I think that once women are empowered to address environmental issues in their communities it is extremely clear that they can make a major impact. I believe the biggest challenge is making this potential known, especially in different cultures around the world in which women play different roles.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. I have always been inspired by Jane Goodall because she has been able to create such a widespread impact in her animal welfare and conservation advocacy. This has especially impressed me since she began her work in Africa on ambition alone, without a formal education in science.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. How close the staff is to one another! This family-like environment creates a very collaborative and creative space that is exciting to see.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? Along with the more specific goal of gaining more fundraising experience, I hope to learn how the WEA staff has been so successful in making a major global impact as a relatively small organization. I am also eager to learn about the journey of each amazing individual in WEA’s staff and their roles in creating social change.

 SERENA YUKO MALKANI – Event Intern

1. Tell us about yourself! What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA? My dream to work for women’s rights started when I was eight years old. After being discriminated against because of my confusing English-Japanese speaking tongue, Indian face, and Japanese identity, my desire to work for social justice flourished. After I graduated from college, I took a leap of faith into my dreamscape and ventured to Washington D.C. where I drowned in a reality that without a graduate degree, I wasn’t experienced enough to work in the field of human rights. As I was mentally preparing to leave the United States for my home in Japan, I mystically stumbled on WEA. The more I read about the organization’s work, I saw my own values for an anti-racist and anti-colonial women’s movement reflected back at me, and without hesitation moved my life to the Bay Area to work alongside great women leaders. My journey to WEA was quite an internal battle and will always remind me to never turn my back on my dreams.

2. What do you do at WEA? I am the event intern, supporting logistics for WEA’s upcoming Gala on September 19th.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know. I share so much with them already! One thing that they may not know is that I love to sing and am secretly ecstatic to be part of such a musical team. I’m also a complete nerd and am constantly reading about topics that are brought up in the WEA office—I have bought more books on indigenous rights as a WEA intern than I ever did as a student!

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? I think one of the biggest challenges is recognizing the interconnectedness of all issues and people globally to women and the environment. It is definitely easy to ignore issues that don’t directly effect us and I think the challenge lies in broadening our scope of what it means to be human—not only that we create and effect the limited environment around us in this present moment, but that our actions and values also effect people distant from us into the future. It will become increasingly more crucial that more people around the world examine their relationship to the issue of women and the environment. Although there is a lot of amazing work being done towards women’s rights and environmental justice, I think this wave of transformation will only be sustainable when individuals around the world, working in various sectors of society, also realize the role they play in this crucial intersection.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. Ever since I learned about the Greenbelt Movement in Kenya, I have been inspired by Wangari Maathai. At a young age she made me see that true transformative and resilient power emerged from courage to take action for other people. As I became more intrigued with the feminist movement, her presence continually reminded me that women, regardless of race or class, are never victims. I am currently reading her biography “Unbowed” every morning on my way to the WEA office. In a dialogue she states, the future does not exist in some far off distance, but exists in the present, and therefore, anything to be realized in the future must be rooted in one’s present actions.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. The work environment, definitely! Everyone is incredibly compassionate and is always willing to share their lives with each other, which makes WEA a genuinely exciting and inspiring place to be. But what has surprised—no, inspired me most, is the conversations on what change means and what WEA’s role is in the process. In no attempt to “save” women, WEA recognizes grassroots women leaders as allies– not only through language– but also through the organization’s design, and actions.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? I hope to get amazing training, learning from each one of the staff members about their work and personal journeys in this field, and gaining the confidence to continue trailblazing my own.

**Lauren Bellenie (not pictured here), one of our impactful Spring interns, stayed with us through the summer and offered us her incredible research talent and calming presence. Read more about here here.

Meet the rest of the talented interns that have worked with WEA throughout the years here!

Meet our Spring Interns!

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Spring is a busy time of year here at Team WEA as we plan for events and shift our programs into high gear.  None of this would be possible without our stellar group of interns who help us keep things running smoothly.  We are so grateful that these wonderful ladies have chosen to share their time and skills with WEA.  So without further ado, here they are!

KELLY YU – General Intern

1. Tell us about yourself!  What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA? I’m a third year undergraduate studying Biology and Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. I stumbled upon WEA while browsing Idealist and once I learned about all the amazing things that the organization does on behalf of women and communities all over the world, I knew that this was the organization I had to be a part of!

2. What do you do at WEA? I’m a General Intern so my role in the office varies each day, but I generally provide support to the WEA team, especially during their fundraising events and through managing donations.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know. I’m a dual citizen as of April 2012! Though I was born in California, the majority of my family is Canadian, including my parents, so I felt it was necessary for me to also have Canadian citizenship because it was such a key part of my identity. I also have no tolerance for spicy food, but I’m trying to work on it.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? The biggest challenge would be for societies around the world to realize that women matter. More often than not, women are often neglected by the decision-makers of society. Yet, it is important to realize that women are not only the most unnoticed but also the most important stakeholders in society. Women are the ones raising families and taking care of the household, and in order for society to flourish and be able to tackle big issues such as population size and environmental degradation, women must be empowered and their opinions must be taken seriously.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. As cliche as this may sound, my mother inspires me the most. I’m fortunate to have such a close mother-daughter relationship with her and be able to call her my best friend. Some people hide things from their parents, but I basically tell my mom everything going on in my life. She and my dad are my rock and support, and I have learned a lot about myself by hearing stories from them.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. Everyone is so nice! I was so nervous on my first day and I did not know what to expect, but WEA is such a welcoming environment and the WEA family readily took me in with open arms. They are the best.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? I hope to learn more about the non-profit world and how organizations function as well as more about the interconnected relationship between women and the environment, as these lessons will definitely help me in the future.

LAUREN BELLENIE – General Intern
1. Tell us about yourself!  What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA? I am a Senior Environmental Science major at the University of San Francisco. I became fascinated with the idea of women’s empowerment as the route to improving quality of life through an internship I did in rural Rajasthan, India. In summer of 2012, I spent ten weeks with a grassroots NGO helping them start a women’s empowerment group. I learned so much about the beauty and pain of being a woman. When I found WEA, I realized it was the perfect way for me to continue learning about and contributing to groups of women similar to those with whom I had worked all summer.

2. What do you do at WEA? I am a General Intern and have only been with WEA for a very short time, so have not gotten too involved yet. Thus far I have been doing organizational tasks and helping tie up the loose ends for the End of the Year Fundraising by completing thank you cards and documenting donations.

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know. I love to dance (anywhere, all the time!), and I wish I had been able to meet and talk with Karl Marx and Erich Fromm.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? One of the biggest challenges in the intersection of women and the environment is building the confidence in women and other community members that women have a unique intelligence and role in society that allows them to nurture people and the earth in a beautiful and effective way. Continuing to create that shift in consciousness, through organizations like WEA and its grassroots colleagues, will pave the way for women to hold power within the community that is recognized rather than overlooked.

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. A woman who inspires me is my best friend, Gina Fountain. She inspires me because she embodies a slew of feminine characteristics and not only holds them proudly, but uses them to her advantage. She is empathetic, forgiving, and exceptionally intelligent and uses these qualities in all areas of her life. She always seeks to support and protect the vulnerable, forgotten, and voiceless. She approaches everything with love AND knows how to have a good time. She is a beautiful human being.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. I’m sure I have many more surprises to come in my time with WEA, but one thing that particularly stood out to me was in reading the employee manual. There was an explicit emphasis of being ‘real’ in the workplace. WEA strives not only to do positive things in the world, but to accept the realities of us being flawed humans. In my time here, I’m very excited to work hard support all of the ongoing projects at WEA in any way I can, but it makes me feel more confident knowing that I’m expected to be human, not Superwoman.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? During my time at WEA, I hope I gain a greater understanding of how non-profits like WEA function. I greatly admire WEA’s emphasis on the idea that we are a network of women around the world, working as a team, not as a first-third world hierarchy. As such, I’d like to learn more about how WEA has created and maintained this network. I’m also looking forward to getting to know my co-workers as they all seem like really amazing women.

TORRIN MARQUARDT – General/Development Intern

1. Tell us about yourself!  What is your background and what has been your journey to WEA?  My name is Torrin Marquardt and I am in my final semester of undergraduate study at UC Berkeley, with a major in Peace and Conflict Studies with a concentration in Culture and Identity, as well as a minor in French. I grew up in various countries around the world, including France, Germany, Cameroon, Madagascar, and Australia. During my time on the African continent I developed an interest in women’s rights advocacy. This interest was then strengthened when I studied abroad in Morocco and interned at a women’s shelter called Au Grain de Sesame. This shelter took impoverished, uneducated women from the medina streets and taught them how to create art out of recycled materials, which was then sold in the shelter’s literary cafe. I was inspired by the organization’s emphasis on training local women and environmental sustainability, and am therefore incredibly excited to be working with WEA to assist other community-based organizations driven by strong women.

2. What do you do at WEA? I’m a General/Development Intern

3. Share 2 unique things about you that your co-workers do not know! 1. The scariest experience of my life was bungee jumping off a 134-meter (440-foot) suspended platform in the Nevis River Valley in New Zealand. 2. I’ve had my pants pulled down to my ankles by a Patas monkey in Cameroon.

4. What do you see as the biggest challenge in the intersection of women and the environment? I believe a major challenge is installing long-term change, rather than simply implementing immediate yet unsustainable solutions. Often aid is provided in monetary forms, which can help in the short run, but does not benefit communities for their futures. Therefore, efforts must be made through training and capacity-building. It’s like that famous proverb: “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”

5. Tell us about a woman who inspires you and why. I know it’s the most cliche answer out there, but my mother is a major inspiration for me. She was very active in supporting women’s rights in our various overseas homes, and this attitude definitely rubbed off on me and is a huge part of why I’m currently interning with WEA. When I think of her work, what immediately comes to mind is the memory of her walking hand-in-hand with Cameroonian women at the front of the Women’s Day Parade. She is one of the most selfless and committed individuals I know.

6. Tell us one thing that surprised you about being at WEA. I was surprised by how loving and welcoming the WEA community was, from the minute I walked in the door for my initial interview. It’s refreshing to be in such a friendly and warm office setting, and I think this attitude definitely translates into how everyone at WEA communicates and interacts with the public.

7. What do you hope to get out of your time at WEA? The kind of work that WEA does is something I want to pursue in the future, so I hope to gain an overall deeper understanding of how a smaller grassroots organization functions. Women and the environment are two areas that I care deeply about, yet are often neglected, and I see WEA as a great starting point for learning how to target these issues.

**Jami Fogelhut (not pictured here) was one of our amazing Fall/Winter General Interns.  We’d like to thank her for all of the hard work she’s done for WEA over the course of her internship!

Meet the rest of the amazing interns that have worked with WEA throughout the years here!

Congrats to Gemma Bulos, GWWI Director Selected as Stanford Social Entrepreneur Fellow!

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A huge congratulations to GWWI Director Gemma Bulos for being selected as 1 of 3 people from around the globe to be a 2013 Stanford Social Entrepreneur Fellow (SEERS Program). This highly competitive program selects social entrepreneurs working on the ground bringing innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing issues.
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Launched in July 2011, the program recognized the need to bring a practitioner’s perspective into the classroom at Stanford University and infuse the research agenda of Stanford’s scholars with a first-hand account of the challenges confronting the increasingly interdependent and connected world. Faculty and researchers at Stanford are eager to access the valuable experience of global practitioners whose insights into the reality of democracy and development on the ground can enrich and deepen their scholarship and theoretical work. Similarly, the creativity of these social entrepreneurs can inspire, provoke, and mobilize the immensely talented young people who study at Stanford and help them to engage even more purposefully with the world.
Gemma will be mentoring students, auditing classes to strengthen GWWIs programs and teaching workshops in Social Entrepreneurship from her experience in East Africa with GWWI and in the Philippines with A Single Drop for Safe Water. Gemma’s work in the Philippines developing an innovative approach to community driven water solutions garnered her top awards from renowned Social Entrepreneur organizations such as Echoing Green, Schwab Foundation, Ernst Young and the Tech Awards. Her breadth of experience has also been recognized by Reuters’/Alertnet where she was named one of the Top 10 Water Solutions Trailblazers in the world and by Filipina Women’s Network as one the 100 Most Influential Thought Leaders and Innovator Filipinas in the USA.
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