Communities Taking a Stand at Standing Rock

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Continuing to send thoughts and strength to the encampment of protectors defending land, water, communities and future. Help to spread the word to build support for the camp and this movement!

Credit: Kim Ryu
Credit: Kim Ryu

Protecting water and our sacred places has always been at the center of our cause. The Indian encampment on the Cannonball grows daily, with nearly 90 tribes now represented. Many of us have been here before, facing the destruction of homelands and waters, as time and time again tribes were ignored when we opposed projects like the Dakota Access pipeline.

Our hand continues to be open to cooperation, and our cause is just. This fight is not just for the interests of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, but also for those of our neighbors on the Missouri River: The ranchers and farmers and small towns who depend on the river have shown overwhelming support for our protest.

As American citizens, we all have a responsibility to speak for a vision of the future that is safe and productive for our grandchildren. We are a peaceful people and our tribal council is committed to nonviolence; it is our constitutional right to express our views and take this stand at the Cannonball camp…

We are also a resilient people who have survived unspeakable hardships in the past, so we know what is at stake now. As our songs and prayers echo across the prairie, we need the public to see that in standing up for our rights, we do so on behalf of the millions of Americans who will be affected by this pipeline.

Read the full article in the NY Times here.

You can also read this article in Yes! Magazine for 3 Reasons the Standing Rock Sioux Can Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, which reminds us that:

People are more powerful than dollars.

Through social media, hundreds and perhaps thousands of people from Indian Country and beyond are making plans to travel to Standing Rock to be on that defense line. This is the power of social media, of people in numbers: There will always be more allies.

Photos Show Why The North Dakota Pipeline Is Problematic

Project: Shedding Light on Environmental Violence in North America

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A protester is arrested for standing on the outer layer of barricades that separate the protest site from the police line and construction zone on Monday morning. Photo: Daniella Zalcman
A protester is arrested for standing on the outer layer of barricades that separate the protest site from the police line and construction zone on Monday morning. Photo: Daniella Zalcman

Last week, the U.S. federal government gave approved the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which will run for 1,172 miles to transport crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken oilfields to Patoka, Illinois. The pipeline would travel through lands sacred to the Lakota people, and cross under the Missouri, Mississippi, and Big Sioux rivers. Just one spill would mean contaminating farmland and drinking water for millions.

Hundreds of land defenders and protectors, including Indigenous community members and their allies, are gathering at the Sacred Stone Camp to say no to the pipeline.

This article from Buzzfeed shows what’s happening on the ground through a series of beautiful photos. And this article by Democracy Now! features an interview with Indigenous leaders and those standing on the frontlines of this battle.

Nepal quake impact on single women highlights need for equal land rights

Project: South Asia Small Grants Initiative

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By now, we are all aware of the devastating impact the 2015 earthquakes had on Nepal. What may not have been as comprehensively covered in the weeks and months that followed was the acute impact on women.

According to this article in Reuters, “Of the more than 900,000 homes damaged and destroyed, about a quarter belonged to female-headed households. More than 500,000 women and girls were displaced and about 2,000 women were widowed, according to official data.”

Photo: UN Women/Piyavit Thongsa-Ard
Photo: UN Women/Piyavit Thongsa-Ard

“The deep gender inequality in Nepal meant that women, and single women in particular, suffered most in the aftermath of the earthquakes,” said Lily Thapa, founder of Women for Human Rights (WHR), a group campaigning for single women’s rights with about 100,000 members.

“They could not make themselves heard and they received the least assistance, which left many vulnerable to abuse, trafficking and harassment,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in Kathmandu.

While the 2015 constitution prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender and established equal property rights, a deep-rooted patriarchy still denies these rights to women, and to single women in particular…

“Strengthening single women’s asset ownership is key to reducing their vulnerability to disasters and boosting their resilience,” Thapa said.

Read the full article here.

Climate Change Effects Lead to Mass Migration in India

Project: South Asia Small Grants Initiative

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Source: Neeta Lal/IPS
Source: Neeta Lal/IPS

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“Displacement for populations due to erratic and extreme weather, a fallout of climate change, has become a scary reality for millions of people across swathes of India. Flooding in Jammu and Kashmir last year, in Uttarakhand in 2013 and in Assam in 2012 displaced 1.5 million people.”

South Asia continues to be hard hit by the effects of climate change. High temperatures, rising sea levels, and increased cyclonic activity in India are creating large-scale migrations. Just in the eastern Indian state of Assam and in Bangladesh alone, its been estimated that a million people have been rendered homeless. As droughts and flash floods prevent the success of crops, as much as a quarter of India’s population has been affected — many of whom, as we know, are women farmers who are the backbones of rural communities.

With precious resources, like land and water, being depleted by every passing day, we as a global community must come together to support one another as we address ‪climate change, and find solutions for those already hit the hardest. We believe women are key to finding, and implementing, these solutions.

To read more about this issue, click here.

“Violence on the Land, Violence on our Bodies” report published

Project: Shedding Light on Environmental Violence in North America

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CHAPTER 1 - IITC Quote

Last month, and after two years in the making, WEA and the Native Youth Sexual Health Network officially launched Violence on the Land, Violence on our Bodies: Building an Indigenous Response to Environmental Violence” a community-based report and toolkit for action. But we didn’t want it to be just a launch; instead, we wanted to use that moment as a unique opportunity to mobilize our community and raise our voices to bring awareness to the connection between violence on the land and the destructive impacts it has on the health and safety of Indigenous women. That’s what the #LandBodyDefense Week of Action on June 6-10, 2016 was all about.

And we want to be sure that everyone who took part in this call to action knows that your participation, engagement and support during the Week of Action made all the difference.

  • On Twitter, more than 1,025 friends and allies shared and posted tweets using the #LandBodyDefense hashtag, helping us to reach nearly 200,000 people and organizations.
  • On Facebook, hundreds of you visited the Week of Action event page, and your messages, posts and shares helped us to reach nearly 3,000 people and organizations.
  • Organizations and media outlets also featured stories or blogs about this work as well, including: TeleSur, Story of Stuff, Sierra Club, and Planet Experts.

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Thank you, everyone, for sharing this community-based report and toolkit with your networks, and for posting your own “Hand to the Land” or chestplate stencil photos. Thank you especially for believing in the urgent need to support Indigenous women and young people’s messages of resistance.

This work is just the beginning. Over the next few months, please continue to share photos and stories related to the social impacts of extreme energy extraction using the #LandBodyDefense hashtag. WEA will also be sharing more on this work and how the resources in the toolkit are being used across impacted communities. Be sure to stay connected!