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63 million people in rural India are living without access to clean water.

Project: Together for H2OPE

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Here, the day after World Water Day, comes a report on the state of world’s water from Water Aid. In its’ summary of the report, The Hindustan Times underlines how the water strain in India is especially damaging to country’s rural communities.

This report is a reminder that water conservation efforts and the efforts of those working to bring underserved communities access to clean water has no specific day or active season. Our project, Together for H2OPE will help to ensure clean water to over 6,500 tea farmers in Assam state, India. For our amazing project partners on the ground and people fighting all over the world to bring this essential life resource to every person, every day is World Water Day. The time is now, yesterday and tomorrow!

Samir Jama/ HT Times file photo

 

Lack of government planning, competing demands, rising population and water-draining agricultural practices are all placing increasing strain on water, said the WaterAid’s report.

Without access to clean water, 63 million people are living in rural areas in India. Diseases such as cholera, blinding trachoma, malaria and dengue are expected to become more common and malnutrition more prevalent, it said.

Rural communities dependent on farming to make a living will struggle to grow food and feed livestock amid soaring temperatures, and women — typically responsible for collecting water — may have to walk even greater distances during prolonged dry seasons, the report forewarned.

Read the full article here, and find the report here.

 

Native Nations Rise: Rise with Standing Rock TODAY!

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The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Indigenous grassroots leaders are calling on allies across the United States and around the world to peacefully March on Washington DC today, March 10th.

WEA rises in spirit, solidarity and allyship with the Indigenous peoples of the world whose rights protect our earth for the future generations of all.

As march organizes have stated, “The Standing Rock movement is bigger than one tribe. It has evolved into a powerful global phenomenon highlighting the necessity to respect Indigenous Nations and their right to protect their homelands, environment and future generations. We are asking our Native relatives from across Turtle Island to rise with us. This is not just about protecting the rights of one tribe, or standing with one nation. If we envision a world where Indigenous people led on environmental and climate issues, we have to protect the rights of all tribal nations and all Indigenous Peoples.”

Indigenous Rights mean Climate Justice.

Indigenous Rights protect water, air, and land.

If you are in the Washington DC area today, please rise in solidarity and allyship with those who are marching for Indigenous rights and the rights of our earth and future generations. More information on the Washington DC march can be found here.

If you’re not in the DC area today, there are solidarity marches taking place all over the country, including a march in San Francisco tonight by Idle No More SF Bay, and we encourage everyone to come out and stand alongside our sisters and brothers.

Visit nativenationsrise.org for all the details and ways to support this critical and historic action!

Fire, water, seeds, action!

Have you read our Winter WEAvings Newsletter? These quarterly emails are just one way we keep our community up to date on the amazing work our partners are doing, the exciting happenings behind the scenes here at WEA, important news impacting our work and world, and ways you can get involved!

In this newsletter we shared:

 

WEA winter newsletter 2017 new

Check WEAvings out here, and be sure to sign up on our website to get all our updates in the future.

Women bear the brunt of climate-forced migration

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In a recent article, the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) stated in 2014, “Environmental migration is a gendered process, but discussions within public, policy, and academia regarding environmental migration are often gender-neutral, few studies making the link between migration, environment and gender.”

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A family from Panama, Sri Lanka is driven out of their home by floodwaters during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Photo: Mangala, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

According to the IOM, “vulnerabilities, experiences, needs and priorities of environmental migrants vary according to women’s and men’s different roles, as do responsibilities, access to information, resources, education, physical security and employment opportunities.”

However, “The struggles of women environmental migrants have been documented but there is no statistical data to formulate effective policies.” What is known is that the IOM’s 2016 Atlas of Environmental Migration, “the latest and most exhaustive study on the subject, claims that in 2015, 19 million people were newly displaced due to climate disasters globally. This figure does not even include displacement from drought and slow onset environmental degradation. Overall, one billion out of the planet’s 7 billion people are presently on the move, either within countries or beyond borders.

Read the full article at Eco-Business here.

 

Tanzanian farmers traditional seed exchange practices under threat

Project: Planting Seeds of Resilience in Southern India

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Photo: Ebe Daems for Mo* Magazine

In order to receive development assistance, Tanzania has to give Western agribusiness full freedom and give enclosed protection for patented seeds. “Eighty percent of the seeds are being shared and sold in an informal system between neighbors, friends and family. The new law criminalizes the practice in Tanzania,” says Michael Farrelly of TOAM, an organic farming movement in Tanzania.

As this article in Mo* Magazine explains, under Tanzania’s new legislation, “‘If you buy seeds from Syngenta or Monsanto…they will retain the intellectual property rights. If you save seeds from your first harvest, you can use them only on your own piece of land for non-commercial purposes. You’re not allowed to share them with your neighbors or with your sister-in-law in a different village, and you cannot sell them for sure. But that’s the entire foundation of the seed system in Africa’, says Michael Farrelly.” To go against the law is to risk a prison sentence of at least 12 years, or a fine of over $219,500, or both. “‘That’s an amount that a Tanzanian farmer cannot even start to imagine. The average wage is still less than 2 US dollars a day’, says Janet Maro, head of Sustainable Agriculture Tanzania (SAT).”

Examples like this from across the world underpin the need WEA learned about for projects like the Seeds of Resilience Project, a partnership between WEA and Vanastree — a women-led seed saving collective in Karnataka, India. The project ensures seed and food sovereignty, as well as the transfer of traditional knowledge in Karnataka State by supporting women to build and scale seed businesses, lead trainings to increase farm biodiversity and productivity, participate in demonstrations and exchanges, and build networks in their communities and beyond. It is a direct response to the growing monocropping and commercialization of agriculture, particularly seeds, that Southern India has experienced.

We send our thoughts and solidarity to the farmers of Tanzania, and will keep our eye on this issue.

Read the full article here.