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The Kurama Women Enterprise team shares clean cookstove technology with their community

Project: WISE Women's Clean Cookstoves Project

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Earlier this spring, WEA and WISE (Women’s Initiative for Sustainable Environment) hosted two week-long training intensives for the women participants of the WISE Women’s Clean Cookstoves Project, which trains local women leaders from Kaduna State in Nigeria to use, promote and sell clean cookstoves. After growing their skills through business training, leadership and advocacy development, and financial planning, these entrepreneurs have launched their own clean cookstove businesses and are well on their way to improving the health and safety of countless women in their home communities, reducing deforestation and greenhouse gases, and increasing their own — and others — household savings.

The Kurama Women Enterprise is just one 15 two-person teams that took part in the WISE Women’s Clean Cookstoves Training. After completing our both training intensives in April and May, entrepreneurs Elizabeth Bawa and Rifkatu Yakubu have been busy organizing outreach events in their community to spread the word about this life-saving technology. Their plan is to sell 120 clean cookstoves in their first 6 months!

Here’s an inside look at one of their recent community demonstrations:


 
To learn more about the WISE Women’s Clean Cookstoves Project, visit our project page.

WEA and WISE’s Clean Cookstoves Training gets national coverage in Nigeria!

Project: WISE Women's Clean Cookstoves Project

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This past April, WEA and WISE (Women’s Initiative for Sustainable Environment) kicked off a series of two training intensives as part of our joint WISE Women’s Clean Cookstoves Training in Kaduna, Nigeria. These trainings aimed not only to provide women in Nigeria with access to life-saving clean cookstoves, but also to equip them with the skills, tools, networks and resources they need to start and scale their own clean cookstove businesses, causing a ripple of clean energy impact throughout their communities.

Why is this so important? Because clean cookstoves saves lives. According to a study done by the World Health Organization, 98,000 Nigerians — mostly women — die annually as a result of smoke inhaled while cooking with firewood. If a woman cooks breakfast, lunch, and dinner for her family with a traditional cookstove, it is the equivalent to smoking 3 to 20 packets of cigarettes a day.

WEA Project Lead and Founder/Director of WISE, Olanike Olugboji, had a chance to talk to some media outlets at the close of the project’s second week-long training intensive at the end of May, and shared with them her own insights on the critical need for this work and women’s entrepreneurial and environmental leadership.

WEA and WISE’s Clean Cookstove Training participants

“This project, according to Olugboji, would help to curb deaths resulting from inhalation of smoke from firewood, which she puts at more than [98,000] death annually in the country. She explained that the second phase of the training, which would end on Friday, was designed to strengthen the women’s marketing strategy in promoting the use of clean cook stove…Similarly, a resource person, Ms. Happy Amos, described clean cook stove as “a social enterprise”, not only for its financial gains, but also for its social and environmental impact.” —  Nigeria News Network

We’re incredibly honored to be involved in this project, and are so inspired by the continued effort and commitment of the women who participated in the training and are now entrepreneurs in their communities!

We’ll be sharing updates with you as we hear back from training participants on the launch of their own businesses, but until then, here’s a roundup of articles that covered this groundbreaking training:

 

How Funding Women’s Climate Action is Unique and Necessary

Project: Mexican Indigenous Women Uniting for Land Protection

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 Global Greengrants Fund, the leading environmental fund supporting grassroots action on a global scale, and The International Network of Women’s Funds have put together a guide to supporting grassroots women’s organizations working on climate justice and women’s rights across the globe. The guide specifically addresses the urgent needs within the funding community and aims to increase appropriate funding for climate action and women’s rights worldwide led by women.

Women’s funders might describe grants that build on women’s traditional roles in agriculture or as service providers… [and] Although such interventions have supported women to mobilize and articulate their rights, they do not always challenge women’s secondary status in societies or address existing power dynamics within families and communities.

You can read the entirety of the guide here.

Women are the victims of climate change – and the keys to climate action

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Are you keeping an eye on the goings on at COP21 in Paris?  We are, and we’re especially interested to see if/how a gendered perspective is incorporated into any (and, hopefully, every!) discussions and mechanisms for moving forward on climate action in a sustainable way.

For more of our take on COP21, read our recent post here, and for an even deeper look at why a gendered lens is so integral to developing effective solutions around climate change, check out this article from The Guardian.

Photo: The Guardian
Photo: The Guardian


“As the nations of the world meet in Paris to address climate change, it is critical that women play a central role in these historic negotiations. Gender equality is central to effective climate action. The world cannot afford to neglect the needs of half the world’s population, nor ignore their talents and potential in innovating solutions…

The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security recently released a new study that examines climate change as a human rights imperative, global security threat and a pervasive strain on economic stability. The report highlights how women bear severe gendered impacts of climate change – including adverse health, economic, social and physical consequences – but systematically lack equal representation in decision-making. 

The report also demonstrates – through a plethora of examples from around the world – that women are critical agents of change. Despite their vulnerabilities, women contribute to both adaptation and mitigation efforts in many parts of the world through creative, localized solutions. Numerous mediating institutions are working to provide women with opportunities to create their own sustainable businesses that also serve to reduce the global threat of climate change”

We’d love to hear what you think about COP21!

Inside the Complex Financial World of Women’s Organizations

Project: South Asia Small Grants Initiative

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Association for Women’s Rights In Development (AWID) has produced a series of reports on the state of fundraising and money in women’s rights organizations . The series, called Where is the Money for Women’s Rights, explores the complexities in obtaining adequate funding for organizations across the globe.

One of the striking paradoxes of this moment is that the spotlight on women and girls seems to have had relatively little impact on improving the funding situation for a large majority of women’s organizations around the world. The ‘leaves’—the individual women and girls—are receiving growing attention, without recognizing or supporting ‘the roots’ – the sustained, collective action by feminists and women’s rights activists and organizations that has been at the core of women’s rights advancements throughout history.

Goals of the research effort were to generate knowledge and analysis of the current financial situation of women’s groups as well as the overall state of fundraising. By doing so, they hope to increase the overall amount and the quality of resources available to women’s organizations. The report also talks about collaborating and strategizing together as part of the overall feminist movement. The report goes on to discuss the myriad and often complex obstacles that prevent most women’s organizations from growing both physically and financially. Of particular note is the sometimes polarizing role that Private Foundations and International NGOs play in the world of women’s organizations.

You can read the whole report, here.