We are so proud to be in partnership with The Native Youth Sexual Health Network on a community-based research and advocacy initiative to address the environmental violence Indigenous women and  youth face as a result of extreme extraction. Everything that impacts the land in turn impacts our bodies. Visit the link below to learn more about this initiative, how…

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One of the key concerns in much of WEA’s work is around the continued presence of environmental racism and environmental violence in Indigenous communities around the world, and how that presence impacts women in particular.  We see this appear in many ways: the siting of hazardous waste facilities, American corporations’ sale and exportation of poisonous…

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In it’s recent report, Climate Change Impacts in the United States, the U.S. Global Change Research Program found that “Indigenous communities in the Southwest are more vulnerable to climate change than ever before.  30% of the Navajo population not served by municipal systems like water will face even greater challenges with increased threats from: drought,…

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By: Sophie Sparksworthy, WEA Intern “Indigenous peoples have the right to the conservation and protection of the environment and the productive capacity of their lands or territories and resources.” — Article 29, UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples   The physical health and cultural well-being of Indigenous communities are threatened by increasing environmental…

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