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Run4Salmon 2019: Save the Date

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Each September for the past 2 years, Chief Caleen Sisk has led the Winnemem Wintu Tribe and allies in the Run4Salmon, a 300-mile journey from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta region to the tribe’s historic village site on the McCloud River near Mt. Shasta. This two-week long prayerful event is a call to action to restore the endangered winter-run Chinook salmon, which are sacred to the Winnemem, and whose populations are severely threatened by climate change and construction of dams in the area.

Planning for this year’s Run4Salmon — which will take place from Sept 15-30 — is underway. WEA was honored to support last year’s run as it traveled through Ohlone territory and will be doing so again this September.

Get updates on the 2019 Run4Salmon here.

New RIPPLE print

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Everyday, WEA women leaders model this most basic truth: when women are equipped with resources and support, they not only profoundly impact their local environment, but they create a positive ripple effect on entire regions. As the U.S. elections and our partners have shown, we can never underestimate the impact that each of our actions has on this world. May all our circles keep widening.

Stay tuned for your chance to grab a limited-edition “RIPPLE” letterpress print or postcard pack. They hit the WEA marketplace in early December!

Meet our newest board member, Charity Tooze

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WEA’s newest Leadership Board member, Charity Tooze, is a longtime champion of women’s rights, and currently serves as Director of Gender, Partnerships, and Communications with Equal Access International. She’s a creative social impact leader with a fierce commitment to uplifting girl and women-led organizations, and we are honored to have her experience and voice on our board.

Meet Binta: A Clean Cookstove Leader, Advocate, and Entrepreneur

Project: WISE Women's Clean Cookstoves Project

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Binta Yahaya is a community mobilizer and environmental advocate from Lere, a rural town in Kaduna State, Nigeria. In her town, most women and girls cook over open fires, and many suffer chronic respiratory infections and other health problems from the toxic smoke. Few are aware that cooking with an open fire is like burning 400 cigarettes an hour in one’s kitchen, or that firewood smoke is the 3rd largest killer of women and children in Nigeria. Even Binta didn’t know what to do about the dangerous accumulation of dirty soot on her own traditional cookstove.

Then she participated in the 9-month 2017-2018 WISE Women’s Clean Cookstoves Training and learned of powerful alternatives. Within 1 week of entrepreneurship, leadership, and technical training, Binta sold 70 clean cookstoves to women in her village. She quickly watched this simple solution reduce sickness, medical bills, and daily fuel costs for these families.

Today, Binta is a clean cookstove entrepreneur, and as a trusted member of her community, people listen. She also launched a second business producing her own clean cookstove model and selling cooking fuel made from agricultural waste instead of charcoal. Every day she improves the lives of people (1,000 already have access to clean energy and improved health because of her), mentors more women entrepreneurs, and plays a part in Nigeria’s clean energy future. On the last day of the training she said, “You have already changed my life…if I had to pay for what I learned from you, I don’t think I could afford it. I have no words but to say thank you.”

Together, Binta and her cohort of clean cookstoves participants have reached over 13,000 people with clean cookstoves. According to Project Drawdown, if adoption grows to 16% by 2050, reductions in emissions will amount to 15.8 gigatons of carbon dioxide, with health benefits reaching millions of households.